Cytotoxic edema steroids

Side effects are minimized by taking the lowest doses possible (that still yields positive results) and following doctor's orders. It is important to avoid self-regulation of the dosage, either by adding more or stopping the drug without a schedule. After prolonged use, steroids must be gradually reduced to permit the adrenal glands to resume natural cortisol production. Eliminating doses too quickly can result in glucocorticoid withdrawal symptoms, worsening of underlying inflammatory disease (rebound effect), or rarely, adrenal crisis (a life-threatening state caused by insufficient levels of adrenal steroids).

General disorders related to VESANOID (tretinoin) administration and/or associated with APL included malaise (66%), shivering (63%), hemorrhage (60%), infections (58%), peripheral edema (52%), pain (37%), chest discomfort (32%), edema (29%), disseminated intravascular coagulation (26%), weight increase (23%), injection site reactions (17%), anorexia (17%), weight decrease (17%), myalgia (14%), flank pain (9%), cellulitis (8%), face edema (6%), fluid imbalance (6%), pallor (6%), lymph disorders (6%), acidosis (3%), hypothermia (3%), ascites (3%).

Renal (kidney) involvement is common, occurring in 30-70 % of patients. Kidney disease is usually noted after the onset of systemic symptoms. More marked findings may also occur including nephrotic syndrome, a situation characterized by abnormal excretion of proteins and lipids in urine, swelling (edema), low level of albumin in blood and hyperlipidemia. High blood pressure (hypertension) and acute kidney failure may also be seen. Worsening of the kidney symptoms and biopsy-confirmed worsening of the kidney lesions may be observed in patients with repeated attacks of rash or hematuria (blood in the urine).

Cytotoxic edema steroids

cytotoxic edema steroids

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