Hysteroid dysphoria symptoms

Scientific basis for the therapeutic use of Withania somnifera (ashwagandha): a review.

Mishra LC, Singh BB, Dagenais S.

Los Angeles College of Chiropractic (LACC), 16200 E Amber Valley Dr., Whittier, CA 90609-1166. [email protected]

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this paper is to review the literature regarding Withania somnifera (ashwagandha, WS) a commonly used herb in Ayurvedic medicine. Specifically, the literature was reviewed for articles pertaining to chemical properties, therapeutic benefits, and toxicity. DESIGN: This review is in a narrative format and consists of all publications relevant to ashwagandha that were identified by the authors through a systematic search of major computerized medical databases; no statistical pooling of results or evaluation of the quality of the studies was performed due to the widely different methods employed by each study. RESULTS: Studies indicate ashwagandha possesses anti-inflammatory, antitumor, antistress, antioxidant, immunomodulatory, hemopoietic, and rejuvenating properties. It also appears to exert a positive influence on the endocrine, cardiopulmonary, and central nervous systems. The mechanisms of action for these properties are not fully understood. Toxicity studies reveal that ashwagandha appears to be a safe compound. CONCLUSION: Preliminary studies have found various constituents of ashwagandha exhibit a variety of therapeutic effects with little or no associated toxicity . These results are very encouraging and indicate this herb should be studied more extensively to confirm these results and reveal other potential therapeutic effects. Clinical trials using ashwagandha for a variety of conditions should also be conducted.

PMID: 10956379

Stone, Michael H. (1993). Abnormalities of personality: within and beyond the realm of treatment . New York: . Norton. Tamney, Joseph B. (2002). The Resilience of Conservative Religion . New York: Cambridge UP.

Histrionic Personality Disorder: links Personality Disorders

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  • Fibromyalgia, Myofascial Pain Syndrome, Chronic Pain Syndrome, and Somatization Disorder - Is There a Connection?
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Web PTypes

AU – Stone MH
TI – Assessing vulnerability to schizophrenia or manic- depression in borderline states.
SO – Schizophrenia Bulletin 1979;5(1):105-10
AB – In a discussion of the article on genetic determinants of borderline conditions by Siever and Gunderson, a phenotypic continuum between pure schizotypal and pure affective conditions is postulated. Many “borderline” cases are seen as attenuated forms of schizophrenia, schizoaffective psychosis, or manic-depression. A Venn diagram illustrates differences among syndromes described by Gunderson, Kernberg, Spitzer, and Klein (“hysteroid dysphoria”). Evidence is presented suggesting that Gunderson’s borderline syndrome contains more schizotypal individuals than Kernberg’s, whereas hysteroid dysphoria is nearer the affective pole of the continuum. A second diagram illustrates how the strength and nature of the genetic factors vary according to the syndrome.

Hysteroid dysphoria has been described as a chronic illness characterized by recurrent periods of depression precipitated by a specific type of stress and associated with a histrionic personality. In addition, there are specific atypical symptoms. The authors tested the syndromal validity of this proposed category in a sample of 1,324 patients with mild depression reported on by psychiatrists in a questionnaire survey. They found 41 (%) who fit a pattern consisting of the basic features of the condition. However, patients who fit this pattern were not more likely to have substantially more atypical symptoms than patients without this pattern. The authors conclude that the syndromal validity of hysteroid dysphoria is not supported.

Hysteroid dysphoria symptoms

hysteroid dysphoria symptoms

Hysteroid dysphoria has been described as a chronic illness characterized by recurrent periods of depression precipitated by a specific type of stress and associated with a histrionic personality. In addition, there are specific atypical symptoms. The authors tested the syndromal validity of this proposed category in a sample of 1,324 patients with mild depression reported on by psychiatrists in a questionnaire survey. They found 41 (%) who fit a pattern consisting of the basic features of the condition. However, patients who fit this pattern were not more likely to have substantially more atypical symptoms than patients without this pattern. The authors conclude that the syndromal validity of hysteroid dysphoria is not supported.

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