Steroid hormone implants

Early versus delayed treatment: For men who need (or will eventually need) hormone therapy, such as men whose PSA levels are rising after surgery or radiation or men with advanced prostate cancer who don’t yet have symptoms, it’s not always clear when it is best to start hormone treatment. Some doctors think that hormone therapy works better if it’s started as soon as possible, even if a man feels well and is not having any symptoms. Some studies have shown that hormone treatment may slow the disease down and perhaps even help men live longer.

Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) (referred to as androstanolone or stanolone when used medically) can also be used in place of testosterone as an androgen. The availability of DHT is limited; it is not available in the United States or Canada, for instance, but it is available in certain European countries, including the United Kingdom , France , Spain , Belgium , Italy , and Luxembourg . [5] DHT is available in formulations including topical gel, buccal or sublingual tablets, and as esters in oil for intramuscular injection. [6] Relative to testosterone, and similarly to many synthetic AAS, DHT has the potential advantages of not being locally potentiated in so-called androgenic tissues that express 5α-reductase (as DHT is already 5α-reduced) and of not being aromatized into an estrogen (it is not a substrate for aromatase).

The most commonly used AAS in medicine are testosterone and its various esters (but most commonly testosterone undecanoate , testosterone enanthate , testosterone cypionate , and testosterone propionate ), [53] nandrolone esters (most commonly nandrolone decanoate and nandrolone phenylpropionate ), stanozolol , and metandienone (methandrostenolone). [1] Others also available and used commonly but to a lesser extent include methyltestosterone , oxandrolone , mesterolone , and oxymetholone , as well as drostanolone propionate , metenolone (methylandrostenolone), and fluoxymesterone . [1] Dihydrotestosterone (DHT; androstanolone, stanolone) and its esters are also notable, although they are not widely used in medicine. [54] Boldenone undecylenate and trenbolone acetate are used in veterinary medicine . [1]

The FDA requires manufacturers of FDA-approved products that contain estrogen and progesterone to use class labeling (the black box warning indicating a drug with special problems, particularly ones that may lead to death or serious injury) reflective of the findings of the WHI. However, because compounded preparations are not approved by the FDA and have no official labeling (ie, a package insert), they are exempt from including contraindications and warnings. They also may have additional risks intrinsic to compounding. The lack of even rudimentary pharmacokinetic data for the commonly prescribed bioidentical hormone preparations should cause considerable concern about the prudence of prescribing such medications. In January 2008, the FDA warned seven pharmacy operations that their claims about the safety and efficacy of their bioidentical hormone replacement therapy preparations were misleading and unsupported by medical evidence because the mixtures were not tested for purity, potency, efficacy, or safety ( 7 ).

Acne is often present. Acne conglobata is a particularly severe form of acne that can develop during steroid abuse or even after the drug has been discontinued. Infections are a common side effect of steroid abuse because of needle sharing and unsanitary techniques used when injecting the drugs into the skin. These are similar risks to IV drug abusers with increased potential to acquire blood-borne infections such as hepatitis and HIV/AIDS . Skin abscesses may occur at injection sites and may spread to other organs of the body. Endocarditis or an infection of the heart valves is not uncommon.

Steroid hormone implants

steroid hormone implants

The FDA requires manufacturers of FDA-approved products that contain estrogen and progesterone to use class labeling (the black box warning indicating a drug with special problems, particularly ones that may lead to death or serious injury) reflective of the findings of the WHI. However, because compounded preparations are not approved by the FDA and have no official labeling (ie, a package insert), they are exempt from including contraindications and warnings. They also may have additional risks intrinsic to compounding. The lack of even rudimentary pharmacokinetic data for the commonly prescribed bioidentical hormone preparations should cause considerable concern about the prudence of prescribing such medications. In January 2008, the FDA warned seven pharmacy operations that their claims about the safety and efficacy of their bioidentical hormone replacement therapy preparations were misleading and unsupported by medical evidence because the mixtures were not tested for purity, potency, efficacy, or safety ( 7 ).

Media:

steroid hormone implantssteroid hormone implantssteroid hormone implantssteroid hormone implantssteroid hormone implants